Posts in Film
A Review of Bill Viola at the Royal Academy of Arts, London

Though the curators of the RA’s Michelangelo / Bill Viola exhibition, Live Death Rebirth, frame the show as a ‘conversation’, it unavoidably sets the two artists up for conflict – one that Viola seems fated to lose. Clearly aware of this temptation, the show’s Introduction over justifies; ‘it is [their] commonality, rather than a suggestion that Viola is a “modern Michelangelo” that the exhibition illuminates’.

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A Review of Ladybird, Directed by Greta Gerwig

Greta Gerwig’s directorial debut is a runaway success. Earning five major Oscar and Golden Globe nominations, Ladybird has been met with critical acclaim alongside indie competition such as Call Me by you Name. Known for headstrong roles in her partner Noah Baumbach’s films Francis Ha and Mistress America, Ladybird is Gerwig’s moment in the limelight - the first of many. 

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A Review of American Honey, Directed by Andrea Arnold

"I’m not going to make an apology for the length. I don’t even mind if people go to the toilet in the middle of it. It’s fine’ declared American Honey's director Andrea Arnold in an interview with Vogue magazine. It's true, you could walk out for five minutes and not be any worse off. There isn’t really a plot, but far from thinking was too long, I never wanted to finish.

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A Review of Cafe Society, Directed by Woody Allen

This is a film that will challenge you, but in the Woody Allen sort of way. It’s light-hearted and self-effacing, but I doubt you’ll laugh out loud; the humour is taciturn, and always curbing the edge of something sadder – something you cannot quite put your finger on. The film opens with a black tie party, filtered through a sleek blue light. 

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A Review of Nocturnal Animals, Directed by Tom Ford

Nocturnal Animals has been heralded over the past year as a masterpiece and seen Tom Ford dubbed a latter-day Hitchcock. The film is entertaining, and features some fine acting and a good script, but I found the direction lacklustre – and left the cinema unmoved and wishing I’d seen this made by a more daring pair of hands, like say Lynne Ramsay. 

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A Review of The Infinite Mix: Contemporary Sound and Image at 180 The Strand, London

The Store at 180 Strand, is not the elegant exhibition space its chi-chi central London address would have you think. Instead, it is a gutted Brutalist concrete-block that shares the same building as a multi-storey car park. Acting as The Hayward Gallery’s North Bank outpost, this otherwise uninhabited space has been transformed. 

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A Review of Youth, Directed by Paolo Sorrentino

Sometimes, the truth is best told sideways. That’s not to say you shouldn’t own up to borrowing your friend’s book, or prevaricate over telling your parents just why you’re so broke. Simple truths are simple to tell: a sentence or two. But the real universal truths about what is it to be human… these are too big to be contained neatly into a phrase or paragraph. The Christian God cannot be comprehended by...

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A Review of The Lobster, Directed by Yorgos Lanthimos

Greek film director Yorgos Lanthimos’s The Lobster is set in a world similar to our own, with one exception: love is state-policed and being alone is illegal. Only days after the break-up of a marriage or the death of a spouse, our hapless heroes are sent to a hotel – presided over by the chillingly imperturbable Olivia Coleman – to find a match. They have 45 days, but can extend their stay and chances of finding love...

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A Review of A Bigger Splash, Directed by Luca Guadagnino

As its name suggests, water is a recurring motif in Luca Guadagnino’s A Bigger Splash and it floods into the film in many guises. Refugees emerge from the sea; a rock pool makes a quiet oasis on a hike; a carafe of water is gulped down one hungover morning. Characters interact by splashing each other playfully, larking around in a lake or vying to swim the most lengths. Tilda Swinton plays a recovering rock...

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A Review of Love 3D, Directed by Gaspar Noé

Love 3D is tale of lost love by the Argentine director Gaspar Noé known best for his controversial works Irreversible and Into the Void. Perhaps as a result of the overwhelming quantity of sex scenes and violent onscreen ejaculation Love 3D has been the subject of much controversy. The narrative trails a passionate sexual relationship between a Parisian artist Electra and her lover Murphy, an American filmmaker. 

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An Interview with the Video Artist and Curator Diana Chire in her Hackney Studio, London

London-based Diana Chire and I first met at her guerilla exhibition Take! Eat! which was launched in opposition to the Frieze Art Fair. Her provocative show of female artists addressed gender, sexuality and social inequalities and is dedicated to making gender disparity an important conversation in the art world. When we met later in her Hackney...

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An Interview with Spanish Film Director David Victori, Winner of the YouTube Film Festival

David Victori has been cited as one of the ten Spanish directors to watch by Variety Magazine. In the past he has been celebrated for making award-winning films like Reaccion, 2008 and La Culpa, 2010. The Los-Angeles based filmmaker shot to fame when his win of the YouTube Your Film Festival was announced at the Venice Film Festival. His subsequent...

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An Interview with the Film Producer and Screenwriter Duncan Way at Chez Prune, Paris

Duncan Way is a Film Producer and Screenwriter. After starting out as a script reader in London, he assisted director Dustin Hoffman on ‘Quartet’. For the last two years he has co-run Film and TV company Lieurac Productions with Louis Le Bayon. Not only have their productions played at the Pompidou Centre and the BFI...

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A Review of Testament of Youth, Directed by James Kent

Testament of Youth traces the experiences of the wildly intelligent writer Vera Brittain throughout World War I. Her journey begins as she defies convention by studying at Oxford University before women could attain a degree. She soon falls in love with her brother’s friend Roland and they begin a correspondence of poetic compositions and stolen hours before tragedy leads her to...

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An Interview with Actress and Writer Sophie Winkleman at Soho House, LA

Our trans-Atlantic interviewee Sophie Winkleman is a celebrated British actress and writer born in Primrose Hill, London in 1980. Now based in LA, the vivacious Sophie is known for her roles as Big Suz in Peep Show, Ashton Kutcher's girlfriend Zoey in Two and a Half Men and as Susan in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.

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A Review of Breathe In, Directed by Drake Doremus

The Sundance Festival winner Drake Doremus gives us Breathe In. This is a brutally honest portrayal of deep, inconvenient love. It crosses the boundaries of age and conformity to achieve a level of purity and raw, emotional intensity. The story follows an English schoolgirl (Felicity Jones) who arrives in America to escape crippling grief. She finds herself...

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