Posts tagged Clayton Press
A Review of Matt Mullican: Pantagraph at Peter Freeman, New York

Matt Mullican has got them both: brains and brawn. If there were intellectual and athletic decathlons in contemporary art, Mullican would win handily. He has the genetic material, training, and discipline. Mullican is the son of artists Lee Mullican and Luchita Hurtado. His father’s work was shown earlier this year at James Cohan (New York).  His mother’s work is currently on show at Park View (Los Angeles).  Mullican’s brother, John, is a writer and documentary filmmaker.  Few families have ”the right stuff” way this one does. 

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A Review of Pipilotti Rist: Pixel Forest at the New Museum, New York

“Help me,” reads a cool, white neon sign on the fourth floor of the New Museum, adjacent to Pipilotti Rist’s installation, 4th Floor to Mildness. It is a portent, an augury. It is visual representation, almost an echo, of a sound bite from Rist’s Selbstlos im Lavabad (Selfless In The Bath of Lava) (Bastard Version), (1994), which is in the museum’s stairwell gallery. Whether you go top down (recommended) or bottom up, this exhibition is vexing and often discomforting.

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A Review of Diana Thater: The Sympathetic Imagination at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

Diana Thater freely admits: “I couldn’t paint. So I decided I would do something I could do.”  Monet was a favorite artist of Thater’s “because of the colors and images. People love Monet.” So while Thater chose not to paint using traditional media, she finesses it using electronic media along with natural and artificial light. 

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A Review of Kerry James Marshall: Mastry at The Met Breuer, New York

Cultural America in the 1950s and 1960s was unrepentantly white.  Before I attended university in upstate New York, my exposure to Black Americans was primarily through a handful of television and movie personalities, athletes, and musicians like, Ella Fitzgerald, Sammy Davis Jr., Sidney Poitier, Ernie Banks, and Harry Belafonte.  At college on the cusp of the 1970s there were only six Blacks in my freshman class of 800.  The campus was mostly white.

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A Review of Jean-Luc Moulène at the Centre Pompidou, Paris

You want to touch. You want to feel the velvety surface of metamorphic rock, the cold clammy-looking surfaces of painted hard foam, the donkey's skull embedded in concrete, and the alien bronze form of a geometric shape.  You want to feel the heft of every object, large and small.  Everything is perfectly executed and flawlessly presented, like a luxury good in a showroom. "I was interested in science before I developed a taste for art," Moulène confesses in the exhibition's artist-annotated catalog.

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A Review of Kyle Thurman: A Lonely Butcher at Off Vendome, New York

“Work“ is the activity and “discipline” is the pervasive ethic in a diverse selection of seductive drawings, paintings, and sculpture that make up Kyle Thurman's current exhibition at Off Vendome. The works seem deliberately unrelated, reflecting a deeply conceptual – strongly Germanic – approach to art making, rare among the many one-medium, one-look artists. There is a unifying story here, nonetheless. 

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A Review of Henry Hudson: Sun City Tanning at Sotheby's S2 Gallery, New York

When asked about the title of his exhibition at Sotheby's New York headquarters, Hudson responded, "Sun city tanning is actually the tanning salon next to my studio in east London.  When I Instagram, it always comes up as my location feed.   But I thought it worked well for the title of the show in regard to ayahuasca being the drug of the "kale" age, and how churches and public buildings in urban cities..

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A Review of Zoe Leonard's solo exhibition 'In the Wake' at Hauser & Wirth, New York

As a phrase, "In the Wake" means in the aftermath.  Zoe Leonard’s exhibition is not just one thing, not one idea, not one emotion.  It consists of single and sets of silver gelatin prints and sculptural installations.  (Only the vibrant dye-transfer prints seen in "Analogue," which was last hung in 2015 at The Museum of Modern Art, are "absent" from this presentation.)  While Leonard’s work is often called elegiac and nostalgic, "reflective" and “heartfelt” are more appropriate.

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