Posts tagged Arteviste
A Review of Mark Shand's Adventures and his Cabinet of Curiosities at Hauser & Wirth, London

‘Cabinet of Curiosities’ is a fitting name for the charity exhibition and auction, which welcomed the bright young things of London’s contemporary art world to Hauser & Wirth. As curated by Ayesha Shand and Davina Harbord, 29 photographs and 101 sculptures were commissioned from emerging artists. 

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An Interview with Painter Louis Thomas at his Studio in Paris, France

As ever, Louis' work caught my eye on Instagram. I was captivated by the intimacy, and decorative nature of his portraits of fellow artists, models and musicians as well as people brought in from the streets of Paris. Across his oeuvre, Louis uses plants and flowers to celebrate the characters of his subjects. His studio is filled with paintings as well as collections of books, herbal tea and dried flowers, which are organised by colour and texture.

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An Interview with Photographer Kate Bellm at her Studio in Deia, Mallorca

Photographer Kate Bellm is based between Mexico and Mallorca where she lives off-grid in the mountains. We were introduced by Lucinda Bellm, founder of Lamb Arts, during her psychedelic Night Sky Rising exhibition. The space's walls were lined with hypnotic landscapes and empowering nudes entwined with Kate's keepsakes. Of course, her photographs are wildly beautiful, but it's her surreal manipulation of colour and texture that makes you feel as if you're walking in a dream.

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An Interview with Romana Londi in her Studio in Shoreditch, London

Italian-Irish artist Romana Londi and I met during the group exhibition Skinscapes curated by Tatiana Cheneviere and Guilia Vandelli at Unit 1 Gallery Workshop. We gave a talk with artist Camilla Emson on the importance of touch, and I visited her studio in preparation for it. Initially my interest lay in the involvement of her practice with technology and the way in which she plays with your senses. 

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A Review of All In: The Mind at House of Vans, London

Running at the House of Vans for ten days in August, ‘all in: the mind’ is a mindful group show, characterised by works which are delicate explorations of the diverse personal manifestations of mental health. An intimate exhibition, a huge variety of works are on display in this carefully curated space.  Modern and stylish in feel, the location under Waterloo’s railway arches emphasises the alternative nature of the show

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An Interview with British painter Faye Wei Wei in her South London studio.

A studio visit with Faye in South London is a transcendental experience. The painter glided around her space, making herbal tea in the Japanese tea set she’d just brought from Tokyo. It felt like entering a Parisian salon with kimonos draped over a piano, and her unique collection of seashells and old postcards scattered everywhere. Quite simply, it was like walking in a dream. 

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A Review of Raqib Shaw at the Whitworth, Manchester

Co-curated by Tate Director, Dr Maria Balshaw, Diana Campbell Betancourt, Director of Dhaka Art Summit and the artist, Shaw’s solo exhibition is part of the New North and South Network. The three-year programme consists of co-commissions, exhibitions and intellectual exchange across a network of eleven arts organisations from the North of England and South Asia and aims to bring prominence to the work of leading Bangladeshi, Indian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan and UK artists.

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A Review of Frieze New York at Randall's Island, New York

Frieze New York is an annual event, which attracts a broad spectrum of collectors, artists and gallerists to make the pilgrimage over the East River and discover an impressive selection of both modern and contemporary art. Across just four days, their hugely diverse audience are exposed to a plethora of cutting-edge works exhibited by more than 200 international galleries as well as a developed program of art talks, lectures and curator-led tours. 

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A Review of A__ is A__ curated by Antonia Marsh at Golborne Gallery

Young curator Antonia Marsh’s group show A _______ is A ______ currently on show at Golborne Gallery presents a seductive dystopian vision of everyday life. Although on the surface the small gallery may appear to be a complacent collection of works revelling in the mundane, there is a distinct punk spirit to be felt and a tangible yearning for something better than that which is.

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A Review of Eddie Martinez: Cowboy Town at Timothy Taylor

With white-washed walls, large colour-splashed figurative canvases, beautifully-bound catalogues and a seriously cool London address, Timothy Taylor is a contemporary art collector’s dream space. Currently exhibiting Eddie Martinez’s second solo show, Cowboy Town, Timothy Taylor has, yet again, shot the lights out.The paintings are raw, bold and predominantly figurative.

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A Review of Lightness at White Rainbow Gallery, London

White Rainbow gallery has united five artists’ explorations of the notion of weightlessness, displaying how artists reconfigure material to distort their physical properties, or so the press release claims. The room is mostly filled with sculptural forms, except for a few wall-mounted works by artist duo Ittah Yoda that hang quietly triumphant behind their neighbours who, despite all their efforts, only seem to prove the rule that weight is an aspect that simply cannot be altered.

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A Review of Black Hole Generation: The Kings are Back at The Dot Project

The Kings are Back at Chelsea space The Dot Project is a bold and evocative showcase of contemporary European painting from a Hungary-based collective that appears to defy convention. David Krňanský, Martin Lukáč and Julius Reichel - collectively known as Black Hole Generation - met whilst studying together at the Academy of Architecture and Design (UMPRUM) in Prague. 

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Highlights of CONDO17 across East, West and South London

Conceived by Vanessa Carlos, co-founder of Carlos/Ishikawa in Stepney Green, which represents the likes of Oscar Murillo and Ed Fornieles, this annual event allows galleries from around the world to transcend geographical boundaries and collaborate. What’s more, the whole scheme is based on generosity and mutual respect: participant galleries only have to pay their host a fee of £600 to cover expenses.

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A Review of the Kader Attia exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, New York

According to the dictionary an oxymoron is a figure of speech in which seemingly contradictory terms are syntactically conjoined, like the words “alternative” and “facts,” often to ridiculous effect. The French-Algerian artist Kader Attia, has explored similarly strange juxtapositions in his latest multimedia exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, a gallery on the Lower East Side. In a video installation titled Reason’s Oxymorons,

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A Review of Marilyn Minter: Dirty/Pretty at The Brooklyn Museum in New York

Metallic lips and outstretched tongues poised to lick. Acrylic nails, mouths crammed full of pearl necklaces and makeup-clad eyes – these are the images that come to mind when I think of Marilyn Minter, who I first discovered while absent-mindedly stalking Miley Cyrus’ Instagram. A blurred portrait showed Miley in all her usual glory - Hollywood white teeth, tongue out, licking a foggy window dripping in condensation.

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A Review of Wandering/WILDING: Blackness on the Internet at IMT Gallery, London

Eloquently curated by Legacy Russell, Wandering/WILDING attempts to articulate the space that black artists have created between the polarity of flagrant and flaneur. The artists are responding to this dichotomy by creating works through media, dance and music - online- in an effort to reclaim the space that they might otherwise feel like they have lost. The significant political back-drop to the exhibition made me consider how successful the internet is as a metropolis for black mobility. 

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An Interview with Internet Artist Petra Cortright in Los Angeles, California

LA-based internet artist Petra Cortright and I were introduced by the Swedish gallerist Carl Kostyal during her recent solo exhibition Orange Blossom Princess Fucking Buttercup at his London space. I felt as if I had discovered a new medium as I felt the impact of seeing her evocative work in the flesh. In fact, I was blown away by her kaleidoscopic paintings made using digital software to blend figurative and abstract elements. 

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A Review of Diana Thater: The Sympathetic Imagination at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

Diana Thater freely admits: “I couldn’t paint. So I decided I would do something I could do.”  Monet was a favorite artist of Thater’s “because of the colors and images. People love Monet.” So while Thater chose not to paint using traditional media, she finesses it using electronic media along with natural and artificial light. 

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A Review of the Sunday Art Fair in Marylebone, London

Sunday Art Fair is a youthful satellite fair running parallel to Frieze London, focusing on younger galleries showing emerging artists. Located accross from Madame Tussauds, Sunday is just a 10 minute walk through Regent’s Park from Frieze. Sunday takes over The University of Westminster’s Ambika P3, “a 14,000 square foot underground hangar once used to test concrete for Spaghetti Junction and the Channel Tunnel.” It is wonderful to step out of Regent’s Park and into a supersised science laboratory. 

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A Review of Uni-Verse by Anouska Beckwith at Palm Tree Gallery, Kensington

Last Friday saw the opening of photographer and multidisciplinary artist, Anouska Beckwith’s first London solo show, showcasing her own imagined Uni ~ Verse. Held at the Palm Tree Gallery on Portobello Road, the exhibition came after Beckwith’s 2015 New York solo debut Transcendence, in addition to recent group shows in London, Paris and Switzerland. Inside the gallery was an immersive organic installation of moss, shrubbery and branches set to ‘encourage gratitude and respect for the natural environment’ amongst the audience.

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