Posts tagged Art four
A Review of William Foyle: Landscapes at Asia House, London

Entering Asia House, I was immediately struck by the overflow of glittering figures adorned in all manner of extravagance; each in silent competition with the other. Air kisses were exchanged, delicately gloved hands waved at exquisitely tailored suits, crisp bubbling champagne was poured, and at the centre of this frenetic whirlpool was Scottish artist William Foyle and his eleven landscapes.

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A Review of Dorothea Tanning at Tate Modern, London

It felt like Dorothea Tanning found me, rather than the other way around. I had heard of a friend’s suicide days before seeing the exhibition, and could see this tragedy’s tendrils creeping through too many lives. But the chain-reactions this set off were not clean or comprehensible – they had spikes. 

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A Review of Tristano di Robilant: Youth at Tristan Hoare, London

In an essay on the poet Enrique Lihn’s In the dark room, the writer Alejandro Zambra says: ‘childhood is, then, a time in the service of ghosts, a place to put images that, seen from the present, form a kind of foundation. A difficult foundation, of course, unsteady: the darkroom is where photographs are developed, where images appear, for the first time fixed on paper, that both authorise and destroy identity’.

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A Review of Tracey Emin: A Fortnight of Tears at White Cube, London

White Cube is showing a ‘Fortnight of Tears’ by Tracey Emin – showing sculpture, neon, film, photography and drawings focusing on the artist’s trauma. A radical departure from previous shows, it deals with the artist’s womanhood, sex, loss, bereavement and renewal through a range of newly developed mediums.

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A Review of Henry Hudson at Hannah Barry Gallery, London

Gone are the days of Hudson’s ultra-bright psychotropic jungle scenes; instead we are treated to pastel-coloured ski slopes with a custom Scagliola floor to match. The exhibition is performative, energising and entirely aesthetic yet, despite all of the niceties, there is an underlying sense of foreboding.

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An Interview with Rich Stapleton, Photographer, at Connolly, London

Rich Stapleton, photographer and co-founder of Cereal magazine, lives and works in Bath. His subject matter focuses on travel and lifestyle and his signature style has been described as having a sense of ‘calm and quiet elegance.’ Known for his clean, sharp aesthetic, Rich is always travelling. Be it Palm Springs, Italy or Japan, he favours natural light and chronicles his discoveries both digitally and on film.

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A Review of Rio Azul by Beatriz Milhazes at White Cube Bermondsey, London

A sun-drenched Sunday afternoon in Bermondsey was the perfect setting to see White Cube’s new show, a large-scale exhibition of works by prominent Brazilian artist Beatriz Milhazes. Entering the stark white space, I felt almost as if I had been transported away to the exotic climes of Brazil - as if when I exited the glass doors I would step out onto the Copacabana. 

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A Review of Eddie Peake at South Gallery White Cube Bermondsey, London

Once an exhibition cautions against nudity it feels more like a promise than a warning, but now that we are more difficult to shock, it seems that nudity needs a sense of purpose or joviality. Said warning appears upon entry to the South Gallery of White Cube Bermondsey and in light of Eddie Peake’s previous installations like Touch 2012, I imagined I would be in luck.

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