Posts tagged Art Two
A Review of Juan Antonio Olivares: Moleculas at Off Vendome, New York

Traditional art media do not ask much of one’s time. Two- and three-dimensional works occupy space: on a wall, on a floor, or even suspended from a ceiling. To borrow from Robert Mangold, these works say, “Here I am. Plonk.” You see it. You might walk around it. You either get it or not. Job done.  Video—time-based media—demands more of the viewer, especially when the work is flat screen and full frontal as opposed to immersive or interactive.

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A Review of teamLab: Transcending Boundaries at Pace Gallery, London

Established in 2001, the ‘Ultra Technologists’, TeamLab, are a Japanese tech-art collective working within the digital realm seeking to ‘transcend physical and conceptual boundaries.’ The interdisciplinary group includes professional animators, graphic designers and artists as well as mathematicians. It was established by Toshiyuki Inoko. By using the digital domain as a key element of their practice, TeamLab produce works of art that connect and flow from one to the other. 

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Fabienne Verdier: Rhythms and Reflections at Waddington Custot, London

Twelve large-scale paintings, and one video - all produced in the last year - adorn the walls of Waddington’s Cork Street space in the artist's breathtaking new exhibition Rhythms and Reflections. The paintings are a result of a phase of multimedia experimentation which began during Verdier’s time as the first visual artist-in-residence at the acclaimed The Juilliard School in New York in 2014. 

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Highlights of CONDO17 across East, West and South London

Conceived by Vanessa Carlos, co-founder of Carlos/Ishikawa in Stepney Green, which represents the likes of Oscar Murillo and Ed Fornieles, this annual event allows galleries from around the world to transcend geographical boundaries and collaborate. What’s more, the whole scheme is based on generosity and mutual respect: participant galleries only have to pay their host a fee of £600 to cover expenses.

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A Review of the Kader Attia exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, New York

According to the dictionary an oxymoron is a figure of speech in which seemingly contradictory terms are syntactically conjoined, like the words “alternative” and “facts,” often to ridiculous effect. The French-Algerian artist Kader Attia, has explored similarly strange juxtapositions in his latest multimedia exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, a gallery on the Lower East Side. In a video installation titled Reason’s Oxymorons,

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A Review of Dan Walsh at Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

“Philip Guston makes an Agnes Martin,” is a phrase that Dan Walsh has often used in interviews to describe his work.  Initially this is a rather weird analogy, thinking of an aesthetic marriage of a politicized figurative painter (following on Guston’s reformation from Abstract-Expressionism) and a transcendent abstract painter, whose work is often confused with Minimalism.  You really have to scratch your head about “Guston x Martin,” borrowing the botanical “x” to symbolize the intergradient of two species. 

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A Review of Yun Hyong-keun at David Zwirner, New York

In a brief word piece titled, “The Eccentricities of an Artist,” published in 1977, Yun Hyong-keun described his life as one without any clear distinction between living and playing. When it occurs to me, I secure my canvas and paint.  At other times, I just sit absentmindedly. . . . Painting is thus enjoyable work.  But when paintings do not work out, it feels like death. . . . In any case, just as I continue to eat and live, I continue to paint. 

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A Review of Marilyn Minter: Dirty/Pretty at The Brooklyn Museum in New York

Metallic lips and outstretched tongues poised to lick. Acrylic nails, mouths crammed full of pearl necklaces and makeup-clad eyes – these are the images that come to mind when I think of Marilyn Minter, who I first discovered while absent-mindedly stalking Miley Cyrus’ Instagram. A blurred portrait showed Miley in all her usual glory - Hollywood white teeth, tongue out, licking a foggy window dripping in condensation.

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A Review of the Robert Rauschenberg Retrospective at Tate Modern, London

Walking into the Rauschenberg restrospective at Tate Modern feels like the landing of Allied forces on the beach.  A surge of raw, brilliant American energy on the banks of the river Thames.  The works are powerful and as much ahead of their time today as they were fifty years ago.  Tate’s show is the first full scale survey of Rauschenberg’s oeuvre since his death in 2008.  The exhibition, produced with New York’s Museum of Modern Art. 

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A Review of Matt Mullican: Pantagraph at Peter Freeman, New York

Matt Mullican has got them both: brains and brawn. If there were intellectual and athletic decathlons in contemporary art, Mullican would win handily. He has the genetic material, training, and discipline. Mullican is the son of artists Lee Mullican and Luchita Hurtado. His father’s work was shown earlier this year at James Cohan (New York).  His mother’s work is currently on show at Park View (Los Angeles).  Mullican’s brother, John, is a writer and documentary filmmaker.  Few families have ”the right stuff” way this one does. 

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A Review of Cy Twombly's Retrospective at Centre Pompidou, Paris

As first published on Artnet, written by Sarah Hyde. The major exhibition “Cy Twombly” opened this month at Centre Pompidou with 140 works of art, including drawings, sculptures, paintings, and photographs that have been thoughtfully brought together by curator Jonas Storsve. The hanging of the exhibition is broadly chronological, and blissfully uncrowded; visitors would be advised to allow plenty of time to fully experience the works included.

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A Review of Flavie Audi: Cell-(estial) at Tristan Hoare Gallery, London

Tucked away in an elegant Georgian townhouse on Fitzroy Square, Flavie Audi’s kaleidoscopic glass creations at Tristan Hoare Gallery offer an otherworldly immersive experience. This is glass as you have never seen it before - experimental forms that inhibit a state far removed from the conventional everyday functions of the material. Glass is an underrated medium with regard to fine art; it thus provides an incredibly unique material for Audi’s opportunistic and insightful creative process, which she herself cites as experimental and innovative.

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A Review of 'Revive!' Curated by Galitzine Mackenzie at St. Mary Magdalene's Church, London

Revive! produced and curated by Sasha Galitzine and Olga MacKenzie invites a dynamic group of young artists to engage with the Crypt of St. Mary Magdalene’s Church, on the canals of Little Venice.  All the works, including several performances, are specific to the site, both its physical layout and symbolic significance.  Works have been placed where corpses were once laid to rest before burial.  In its time, the church was built amidst a Victorian slum. 

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A Review of Mark Leckey: Containers and Their Drivers at PS1, Long Island City, New York

The smell of meat stock permeated all three floors of PS1. It was an unintended olfactory punch from the Kunsthalle’s in-house restaurant, M. Wells Dinette. Yet, the cloying, unctuous odor created an additional atmospheric in Mark Leckey's sensory assault. PS1 smelled like a fatty broth or stew in an English working man's café, which seemed sort of appropriate given Leckey’s self-described working class background. 

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A Review of France-Lise McGurn: Mondo Throb at Bosse & Baum in Peckham, London

Taken from an array of visual influences in film, art, television and music, France-Lise McGurn’s new exhibition Mondo Throb at Peckham-based gallery Bosse & Baum is an eruption of vibrant and sexually impulsive figurative paintings and drawings. Often extending beyond the confines of the canvas, McGurn creates an abundance of sensual imagery that spills out onto the walls and floor of the gallery. The composition and form of the layered figures developed from sketches derive from a multitude of influences. 

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A Review of Wandering/WILDING: Blackness on the Internet at IMT Gallery, London

Eloquently curated by Legacy Russell, Wandering/WILDING attempts to articulate the space that black artists have created between the polarity of flagrant and flaneur. The artists are responding to this dichotomy by creating works through media, dance and music - online- in an effort to reclaim the space that they might otherwise feel like they have lost. The significant political back-drop to the exhibition made me consider how successful the internet is as a metropolis for black mobility. 

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A Review of Charlie Roberts: Juicy at Marlborough Contemporary, London

If you haven't yet heard of Kansas-born contemporary artist Charlie Roberts, you are in for a treat. Roberts' newest body of work Juicy is now on display at London's Marlborough Contemporary and showcases the artist at his very best. Juicy appears to be about the story within the story, but is it as simple as that? A hybrid collective of figurative and abstract compositions, Juicy is a visual storyboard that details the inspirations behind Roberts’ work. 

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A Review of Inside: Artists and Readers at HM Prison Reading by Artangel

Inside is both very beautiful, and very painful. - Beautiful because of the art that has been assembled, and the architecture of the prison itself.  Painful because the prison does not, at first glance, look so terrible.  It even resembles university halls of residence.  Were they not called “cells” with bars at the windows and doors that lock from the outside, these would be premium, en suite rooms. But they are not, and never were. At one point the toilets were ripped out so that inmates could not use the pipes as a form of communication. 

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A Review of The Vulgar: Fashion Redefined at Barbican Art Gallery, London

Articulately narrated and presented, the exhibition was created through the collaboration of curator Judith Clark and psychoanalyst Adam Philips. Taking Philips’ definition of “vulgar” as a starting point, the exhibition looks at 500 years of fashion through the prism of 20 different eras and themes. In Philip’s words: “vulgar is either what the vast majority of us are; or the vulgar are those who ... pretend to be something we would like to be.”

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A Review of Diana Thater: The Sympathetic Imagination at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

Diana Thater freely admits: “I couldn’t paint. So I decided I would do something I could do.”  Monet was a favorite artist of Thater’s “because of the colors and images. People love Monet.” So while Thater chose not to paint using traditional media, she finesses it using electronic media along with natural and artificial light. 

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