Posts tagged Art One
A Review of Inside: Artists and Readers at HM Prison Reading by Artangel

Inside is both very beautiful, and very painful. - Beautiful because of the art that has been assembled, and the architecture of the prison itself.  Painful because the prison does not, at first glance, look so terrible.  It even resembles university halls of residence.  Were they not called “cells” with bars at the windows and doors that lock from the outside, these would be premium, en suite rooms. But they are not, and never were. At one point the toilets were ripped out so that inmates could not use the pipes as a form of communication. 

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A Review of The Vulgar: Fashion Redefined at Barbican Art Gallery, London

Articulately narrated and presented, the exhibition was created through the collaboration of curator Judith Clark and psychoanalyst Adam Philips. Taking Philips’ definition of “vulgar” as a starting point, the exhibition looks at 500 years of fashion through the prism of 20 different eras and themes. In Philip’s words: “vulgar is either what the vast majority of us are; or the vulgar are those who ... pretend to be something we would like to be.”

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A Review of Diana Thater: The Sympathetic Imagination at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

Diana Thater freely admits: “I couldn’t paint. So I decided I would do something I could do.”  Monet was a favorite artist of Thater’s “because of the colors and images. People love Monet.” So while Thater chose not to paint using traditional media, she finesses it using electronic media along with natural and artificial light. 

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A Review of The EY Exhibition: Wilfredo Lam at Tate Modern, London

With President Obama’s historic visit to Cuba earlier this year, the world focuses with renewed interest on the influence of Cuban social history on Modern and Contemporary art. As such there could not be a better time for the Tate Modern’s monographic retrospective of work by Cuban-born Modernist turned Surrealist artist Wifredo Lam. The EY Exhibition has been organized in conjunction with the Centre Pompidou and the Musée national d’art moderne, Paris, and curated by Dr Matthew Gale.

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A Review of Kerry James Marshall: Mastry at The Met Breuer, New York

Cultural America in the 1950s and 1960s was unrepentantly white.  Before I attended university in upstate New York, my exposure to Black Americans was primarily through a handful of television and movie personalities, athletes, and musicians like, Ella Fitzgerald, Sammy Davis Jr., Sidney Poitier, Ernie Banks, and Harry Belafonte.  At college on the cusp of the 1970s there were only six Blacks in my freshman class of 800.  The campus was mostly white.

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A Review of The Infinite Mix: Contemporary Sound and Image at 180 The Strand, London

The Store at 180 Strand, is not the elegant exhibition space its chi-chi central London address would have you think. Instead, it is a gutted Brutalist concrete-block that shares the same building as a multi-storey car park. Acting as The Hayward Gallery’s North Bank outpost, this otherwise uninhabited space has been transformed. 

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A Review of Valery Chtak’s ‘If My Way – No Way’ at The Moscow Museum of Modern Art, Russia

‘Love does not demand an axe’ – states one of the murals by Valery Chtak exhibited in the Moscow Museum of Modern Art. Along with ‘L’art c’est hip-hop’, ‘The fact that I am a Marxist does not mean I don’t care’ and other wannabe slogans and leftist maxims created and put on show by the Russian artist as a kind of self-explanatory manifesto and resume of his almost 20 years in art.

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A Review of Jason Matthew Lee: Bromide Mayo at Crèvecoeur, Paris

The emerging art market is cluttered with Internet-derived and -based art, most of which is instantaneously forgettable. This art is like scrolling idly and aimlessly through web pages during a conference call.  There are artists who sample images and then awkwardly recombine them into Rosenquist-esque paintings with little regard for content or technique. Then . . . there are the few artists working in and around technology and the Internet who have something to say, clearly and confidently. Jason Matthew Lee falls into this rarefied category. 

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A Review of the Sunday Art Fair in Marylebone, London

Sunday Art Fair is a youthful satellite fair running parallel to Frieze London, focusing on younger galleries showing emerging artists. Located accross from Madame Tussauds, Sunday is just a 10 minute walk through Regent’s Park from Frieze. Sunday takes over The University of Westminster’s Ambika P3, “a 14,000 square foot underground hangar once used to test concrete for Spaghetti Junction and the Channel Tunnel.” It is wonderful to step out of Regent’s Park and into a supersised science laboratory. 

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A Review of Jean-Luc Moulène at the Centre Pompidou, Paris

You want to touch. You want to feel the velvety surface of metamorphic rock, the cold clammy-looking surfaces of painted hard foam, the donkey's skull embedded in concrete, and the alien bronze form of a geometric shape.  You want to feel the heft of every object, large and small.  Everything is perfectly executed and flawlessly presented, like a luxury good in a showroom. "I was interested in science before I developed a taste for art," Moulène confesses in the exhibition's artist-annotated catalog.

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A Review of Oceans Without Surfers, Cowboys Without Marlboros at PM/AM, London

Situated on the Old Marylebone Road, the white facade of the West London gallery PM/AM juxtaposes the surrounding red brick buildings. The gallery's white neon sign is reminiscent - not in a sleazy sense - of those found in the red light district of Amsterdam. It's punchy, memorable and certainly entices you into their space. Originally a garage for collectable cars, the interior remains

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A Review of Marc Camille Chaimowicz: An Autumn Lexicon at the Serpentine Gallery, London

The heart of French artist Marc Camille Chaimowicz’s glorious new show is an exploration of how we write our own narratives through the spaces and objects around us. Utilising old and new work, found objects and the work of others, Chaimowicz has transformed the Serpentine Gallery in London into an immersive interior, that acts as a self-portrait or memoir to his own life and career

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A Review of Abstract Expressionism at the Royal Academy of Arts, London

Invigorating, intense, emotional, dramatic. The art of Abstract Expressionism that originated in a world reeling from the uncertainty of the postwar years strongly resonates with the chaotic political climate of today. It delivers an inspiring message to the potential creators of today’s culture - where destruction took place in the twentieth century, creativity arose as a confident response, pioneering new techniques 

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A Review of Kyle Thurman: A Lonely Butcher at Off Vendome, New York

“Work“ is the activity and “discipline” is the pervasive ethic in a diverse selection of seductive drawings, paintings, and sculpture that make up Kyle Thurman's current exhibition at Off Vendome. The works seem deliberately unrelated, reflecting a deeply conceptual – strongly Germanic – approach to art making, rare among the many one-medium, one-look artists. There is a unifying story here, nonetheless. 

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A Review of Henry Hudson: Sun City Tanning at Sotheby's S2 Gallery, New York

When asked about the title of his exhibition at Sotheby's New York headquarters, Hudson responded, "Sun city tanning is actually the tanning salon next to my studio in east London.  When I Instagram, it always comes up as my location feed.   But I thought it worked well for the title of the show in regard to ayahuasca being the drug of the "kale" age, and how churches and public buildings in urban cities..

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A Review of the Turner Prize 2016 Exhibition at Tate Britain, London

Known for its cutting-edge commentary on contemporary art, the Turner Prize 2016 opened at Tate Britain, London on September 27th, marking its 32nd year in existence. As ever, this year’s prize attracted media scrutiny upon the early announcement of its four nominees back in May, inviting the usual refrains of  "is it art?" and "what does it mean?" Fittingly then, the exhibition opens with Helen Marten’s (purposefully) enigmatic installations. 

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A Review of the Georgia O'Keeffe Retrospective at Tate Modern, London

Georgia O’Keeffe’s retrospective at Tate Modern coincides with the much-anticipated Switch House extension, but has independently attracted thousands of summer visitors. It is perhaps because the great American modernist gave a voice to those influential female artists overlooked during the twentieth century. Curated by Tanya Barson, the exhibition brings together six decades of O’Keeffe’s work.

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The Painting with Light Exhibition at Tate Britain, London

Tate Britain’s first exhibition celebrating the birth of photography and its consequential impact on British art of the Victorian and Edwardian eras quite frankly lacks the pizzazz needed to make it flash. With the curators adopting a comparative approach, juxtaposing original photographs and oil paintings in a simplistic ' two works depict the same subject matter kind of way'  little is left to the imagination.

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A Review of Jorge Mayet's Broken Landscape at Richard Taittinger Gallery, New York

Heartbreak is at the root of Jorge Mayet’s latest exhibition Broken Landscape on view at Richard Taittinger Gallery, New York. Upon entrance the viewer is struck by a large upheaved tree, a hallmark of Mayet’s oeuvre and the repeated sculptural realization of this motif comprise his latest body of work. The uprooted trees fabricated from sponge, wire, papier-mâché, textiles and acrylics hang suspended in the gallery space creating an eerie hovering garden.

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The 'Closer to the Veg' Exhibition at the Fitzroy Park Allotments, London

The ordered chaos of the Fitzroy Park Allotments on the edge of Hampstead Heath has lately been invaded. It has been besieged by a series of installations and site-specific artworks in an exhibition entitled Closer To The Veg, so that it's now overrun with the likes of ring-necked parakeets. So different is this exhibition curated by Olga Mackenzie and Sasha Galitzine that it's drawn many curious Londoners to see work by 16 artists. 

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