Posts in Editor's Choice
A Review of 黄宇兴 Huang Yuxing: 物华 Essence of Landscape at König Galerie, London

The unassuming entrance to the König Galerie and series of corridors leading to the exhibition room create a sense of isolation, a clean slate from which to view the highly saturated works of Huang Yuxing. Having never visited the gallery before, it was a curious space with low ceilings and beams, between which individual works were nestled.

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An Interview with Carolina Mazzolari in her Studio in Clapton, London

Carolina Mazzolari is a Milanese artist known for her multidisciplinary practice involving textile manipulation, painting, photography, video and performance. I visited the studio she shares with her husband Conrad Shawcross in Clapton, London and left feeling both uplifted and inspired by her practice.

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A Review of Tamara Dean: Endangered at Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney

Endangered is the newest instalment of Australian photographer Tamara Dean’s Endangered Series which she began with great success in 2018; a deeply moving and provocative collection of images (of pure pigment print on cotton rag paper) designed to reframe how we see ourselves as human beings.

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An Interview with Venetia Berry in her Studio in Brixton, London

Venetia Berry is a London-based artist known for her abstract nudes rendered with gestural brushstrokes and uplifting colour palette across her painting and ceramics. A graduate of Leith School of Art, Edinburgh and the Royal Drawing School, London she seeks, “to reverse the male gaze, challenging the archetypal sexualised female nude.”

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A Review of Afterimage: Dangdai Yishu at Lisson Gallery, London

By proposing a fresh and alternative definition – or lack thereof – of Chinese contemporary art, guest curator Victor Wang presents a symphony of dynamic, multi-disciplinary and insightful artworks by nine brilliant Chinese contemporary artists. The show unfolds to, and together with, the viewer as an open and unremittingly changing discourse, its currents imbued with a penetrating and movingly authentic echo of individual agency. 

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A Review of William Foyle: Landscapes at Asia House, London

Entering Asia House, I was immediately struck by the overflow of glittering figures adorned in all manner of extravagance; each in silent competition with the other. Air kisses were exchanged, delicately gloved hands waved at exquisitely tailored suits, crisp bubbling champagne was poured, and at the centre of this frenetic whirlpool was Scottish artist William Foyle and his eleven landscapes.

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A Review of Tristano di Robilant: Youth at Tristan Hoare, London

In an essay on the poet Enrique Lihn’s In the dark room, the writer Alejandro Zambra says: ‘childhood is, then, a time in the service of ghosts, a place to put images that, seen from the present, form a kind of foundation. A difficult foundation, of course, unsteady: the darkroom is where photographs are developed, where images appear, for the first time fixed on paper, that both authorise and destroy identity’.

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A Review of Anne Imhof: Sex at Tate Modern, London

Anne Imhof's third solo exhibition, Sex, a highly anticipated followup to both Angst (2016) and Faust (2017) was unsurprisingly in keeping with the artists known aesthetic and mimicked the uneasy atmosphere of both her previous endurance performances. Elevated platforms, serpentine movements, dead-eyed stares, smoke and the odd bit of fire connect all three of Imhofs performances to date.

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A Review of Henry Hudson at Hannah Barry Gallery, London

Gone are the days of Hudson’s ultra-bright psychotropic jungle scenes; instead we are treated to pastel-coloured ski slopes with a custom Scagliola floor to match. The exhibition is performative, energising and entirely aesthetic yet, despite all of the niceties, there is an underlying sense of foreboding.

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A Review of Tom Wesselmann at Almine Rech Gallery, London

Almine Rech Gallery presents a provocative, uplifting survey of work made in the final years of Tom Wesselmann’s life. Large-scale Sunset Nudes (2002–4), are paired with painted aluminium wall assemblages dating from the same period, their maquettes on public display here for the first time.

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An Interview with Indre Serpytyte-Roberts at her Studio in Marylebone, London

Indre previously stated that, “you have to be honest on what touches you and what you believe in” and this perfectly captures her sincere approach. Across mediums such as photography, sculpture and textiles, she finds beauty in sombre themes such as memory, trauma and loss. Her work has been met with critical acclaim in publications such as the New York Times, Artnet and Wallpaper.

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A Review of Dan Walsh at Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

“Philip Guston makes an Agnes Martin,” is a phrase that Dan Walsh has often used in interviews to describe his work.  Initially this is a rather weird analogy, thinking of an aesthetic marriage of a politicized figurative painter (following on Guston’s reformation from Abstract-Expressionism) and a transcendent abstract painter, whose work is often confused with Minimalism.  You really have to scratch your head about “Guston x Martin,” borrowing the botanical “x” to symbolize the intergradient of two species. 

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An Interview with Artist Maximilian Magnus at his Studio in Prenzlauer Berg, Berlin

I first encountered the German artist Maximilian Magnus’s large-scale paintings during Frieze Week at the exhibition What’s Up 2.0 curated by Lawrence Van Hagen. A few weeks later I arrived at the artist’s Berlin studio to see the beautiful space where his abstract-expressionistic paintings are created. Maximilian is known for being the young painter invited to live and work in Willem de Kooning’s East Hampton studio.

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An Interview with Internet Artist Petra Cortright in Los Angeles, California

LA-based internet artist Petra Cortright and I were introduced by the Swedish gallerist Carl Kostyal during her recent solo exhibition Orange Blossom Princess Fucking Buttercup at his London space. I felt as if I had discovered a new medium as I felt the impact of seeing her evocative work in the flesh. In fact, I was blown away by her kaleidoscopic paintings made using digital software to blend figurative and abstract elements. 

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