Posts in Art Four
A Review of Anya Gallaccio: Stroke at Blum & Poe, Los Angeles

While few of us hold the golden ticket to Willy Wonka’s magical chocolate factory, stepping inside Anya Gallaccio’s installation, Stroke, at Blum & Poe, Los Angeles is a portal to delightful possibilities. It is a momentary respite from the Los Angeles smog and snarling traffic; a gentle reminder that sometimes an oasis appears in the most unexpected of places. Twice if one is lucky enough. 

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A Review of Mono-ha: The Art of Nothingness at Aki Gallery, Taipei

In line with a recent exhibition programme showcasing contemporary Japanese art, this October Aki Gallery presented Mono-ha: The Art of Nothingness in Taipei. The three floors of the gallery echo with elegant silence and unseasoned materiality as narrated by six pivotal Japanese Mono-ha artists.

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A Review of Theaster Gates: Collective Intimacy at Prada Mode, London

Without spelling it out for us, American artist and filmmaker Theaster Gates has harnessed the power of intimacy and channelled it into his warm, hospitable alternative space created with Prada Mode. This immersive live installation at 180 The Strand, is also in collaboration with The Vinyl Factory and The Showroom London.

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A Review of Lari Pittman: Declaration of Independence at The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles

Lari Pittman is a master of precarious balance. He embraces the fine line between Apollonian and Dionysian impulse and conspires to upend any preconceived notions one might have about order and chaos, the sacred and the profane.

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A Review of Anjum Singh: I Am Still Here at Talwar Gallery, New Delhi

Anjum Singh’s autobiographical exhibition I Am Still Here at Talwar Gallery in New Delhi, has easily been one of the most anticipated exhibitions of 2019. To the delight of many, Singh has declared her return to the global art scene after her shocking cancer diagnosis in 2014.

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A Review of 黄宇兴 Huang Yuxing: 物华 Essence of Landscape at König Galerie, London

The unassuming entrance to the König Galerie and series of corridors leading to the exhibition room create a sense of isolation, a clean slate from which to view the highly saturated works of Huang Yuxing. Having never visited the gallery before, it was a curious space with low ceilings and beams, between which individual works were nestled.

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A Review of Luchita Hurtado: I Live I Die I Will Be Reborn at Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London

There is a lot to take in from Luchita Hurtado’s first public solo exhibition. Her lengthy career, still continuing today, is exhibited in a near 80-year chronology by the Serpentine Sackler Gallery. The cyclical nature of the exhibition pays homage to the environmental themes and of course the exhibition’s very own title.

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A Review of Elective Affinities: Edmund de Waal at The Frick Collection, New York

Elective Affinities: Edmund de Waal at The Frick Collection sings beautifully. If you look closely enough you can feel the presence of both melody and counterpoint. In this exhibition, Edmund de Waal, a ceramist known for his porcelain vessels ˗ and the clean, minimalist structures in which he has arranged his pieces since 2005 ˗ engages in dialogue with the permanent holdings of The Frick Collection, addressing the weight of history, of art, of porcelain, and ever attentive to the cadences of life.

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A Review of Manolo Blahnik: An Enquiring Mind at The Wallace Collection, London

When I first heard about An Enquiring Mind, curated by The Wallace Collection's director, Dr Xavier Bray and legendary luxury shoe designer Manolo Blahnik, I was equal parts intrigued and apprehensive. Slyly written between the lines of the romantic promotional poster was the age-old question: What is Art? Art meaning the cerebral and moving rather than the merely ‘decorative’ or the distastefully frivolous?

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A Review of WORD PLAY: Language As Medium at The Bonnier Gallery, Miami

WORD PLAY: Language As Medium, is a tightly curated exhibition on view at The Bonnier Gallery in Miami, Florida through July 20, 2019.  It features works by artists Fiona Banner, Benjamin Bellas, Mel Bochner, David Moreno, Kay Rosen, and Damon Zucconi, and slyly explores the philosophical underpinnings of language. The exhibition's catalogue essay provides the viewer with an overview of the role of language as conceptual art within the context of Postwar Art. 

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A Review of Afterimage: Dangdai Yishu at Lisson Gallery, London

By proposing a fresh and alternative definition – or lack thereof – of Chinese contemporary art, guest curator Victor Wang presents a symphony of dynamic, multi-disciplinary and insightful artworks by nine brilliant Chinese contemporary artists. The show unfolds to, and together with, the viewer as an open and unremittingly changing discourse, its currents imbued with a penetrating and movingly authentic echo of individual agency. 

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A Review of Oscar Murillo: Manifestation at David Zwirner, London

Upon entering David Zwirner, one is affronted by three large, deep-red canvases which occupy and overpower the primary wall of the main gallery with their assured presence. These new manifestation works at first push the audience away, asking the viewer to beguile in their pigmented facades from a distance, then following a pause, draws them in with textural details, liminal text and the jarring churnings of visceral brushstrokes.

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A Review of Lee Krasner: Living Colour at Barbican Art Gallery, London

The Barbican retrospective, the first in Europe for over fifty years, presents some one-hundred works, many of which are available to the UK public for the first time. Organised chronologically, and ranging from early monochromatic, cubist drawings to large scale, colourful abstract paintings, it finally debunks the myth of Krasner as merely the wife of Jackson Pollock.

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A Review of William Foyle: Landscapes at Asia House, London

Entering Asia House, I was immediately struck by the overflow of glittering figures adorned in all manner of extravagance; each in silent competition with the other. Air kisses were exchanged, delicately gloved hands waved at exquisitely tailored suits, crisp bubbling champagne was poured, and at the centre of this frenetic whirlpool was Scottish artist William Foyle and his eleven landscapes.

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A Review of Dorothea Tanning at Tate Modern, London

It felt like Dorothea Tanning found me, rather than the other way around. I had heard of a friend’s suicide days before seeing the exhibition, and could see this tragedy’s tendrils creeping through too many lives. But the chain-reactions this set off were not clean or comprehensible – they had spikes. 

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A Review of Tristano di Robilant: Youth at Tristan Hoare, London

In an essay on the poet Enrique Lihn’s In the dark room, the writer Alejandro Zambra says: ‘childhood is, then, a time in the service of ghosts, a place to put images that, seen from the present, form a kind of foundation. A difficult foundation, of course, unsteady: the darkroom is where photographs are developed, where images appear, for the first time fixed on paper, that both authorise and destroy identity’.

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A Review of Tracey Emin: A Fortnight of Tears at White Cube, London

White Cube is showing a ‘Fortnight of Tears’ by Tracey Emin – showing sculpture, neon, film, photography and drawings focusing on the artist’s trauma. A radical departure from previous shows, it deals with the artist’s womanhood, sex, loss, bereavement and renewal through a range of newly developed mediums.

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A Review of Diane Arbus: In the Beginning at Hayward Gallery, London

With some of the most recognisable photographs in existence, Diane Arbus (1923–1971), made her mark in New York and the art world forever with her singular method of portraiture. The latest show to honour her work was organised by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and adapted for Hayward Gallery.

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