Posts in "contemporary"
A Review of Afterimage: Dangdai Yishu at Lisson Gallery, London

By proposing a fresh and alternative definition – or lack thereof – of Chinese contemporary art, guest curator Victor Wang presents a symphony of dynamic, multi-disciplinary and insightful artworks by nine brilliant Chinese contemporary artists. The show unfolds to, and together with, the viewer as an open and unremittingly changing discourse, its currents imbued with a penetrating and movingly authentic echo of individual agency. 

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A Review of Oscar Murillo: Manifestation at David Zwirner, London

Upon entering David Zwirner, one is affronted by three large, deep-red canvases which occupy and overpower the primary wall of the main gallery with their assured presence. These new manifestation works at first push the audience away, asking the viewer to beguile in their pigmented facades from a distance, then following a pause, draws them in with textural details, liminal text and the jarring churnings of visceral brushstrokes.

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A Review of Lee Krasner: Living Colour at Barbican Art Gallery, London

The Barbican retrospective, the first in Europe for over fifty years, presents some one-hundred works, many of which are available to the UK public for the first time. Organised chronologically, and ranging from early monochromatic, cubist drawings to large scale, colourful abstract paintings, it finally debunks the myth of Krasner as merely the wife of Jackson Pollock.

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A Review of William Foyle: Landscapes at Asia House, London

Entering Asia House, I was immediately struck by the overflow of glittering figures adorned in all manner of extravagance; each in silent competition with the other. Air kisses were exchanged, delicately gloved hands waved at exquisitely tailored suits, crisp bubbling champagne was poured, and at the centre of this frenetic whirlpool was Scottish artist William Foyle and his eleven landscapes.

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A Review of Dorothea Tanning at Tate Modern, London

It felt like Dorothea Tanning found me, rather than the other way around. I had heard of a friend’s suicide days before seeing the exhibition, and could see this tragedy’s tendrils creeping through too many lives. But the chain-reactions this set off were not clean or comprehensible – they had spikes. 

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A Review of Tristano di Robilant: Youth at Tristan Hoare, London

In an essay on the poet Enrique Lihn’s In the dark room, the writer Alejandro Zambra says: ‘childhood is, then, a time in the service of ghosts, a place to put images that, seen from the present, form a kind of foundation. A difficult foundation, of course, unsteady: the darkroom is where photographs are developed, where images appear, for the first time fixed on paper, that both authorise and destroy identity’.

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A Review of Tracey Emin: A Fortnight of Tears at White Cube, London

White Cube is showing a ‘Fortnight of Tears’ by Tracey Emin – showing sculpture, neon, film, photography and drawings focusing on the artist’s trauma. A radical departure from previous shows, it deals with the artist’s womanhood, sex, loss, bereavement and renewal through a range of newly developed mediums.

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A Review of Diane Arbus: In the Beginning at Hayward Gallery, London

With some of the most recognisable photographs in existence, Diane Arbus (1923–1971), made her mark in New York and the art world forever with her singular method of portraiture. The latest show to honour her work was organised by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and adapted for Hayward Gallery.

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A Review of Anne Imhof: Sex at Tate Modern, London

Anne Imhof's third solo exhibition, Sex, a highly anticipated followup to both Angst (2016) and Faust (2017) was unsurprisingly in keeping with the artists known aesthetic and mimicked the uneasy atmosphere of both her previous endurance performances. Elevated platforms, serpentine movements, dead-eyed stares, smoke and the odd bit of fire connect all three of Imhofs performances to date.

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A Review of Geta Brătescu: The Power of the Line at Hauser & Wirth, London

Hauser & Wirth homages Geta Brătescu in its latest exhibition, The Power of the Line. It explores the constantly evolving use of the line in the artist’s most recent works. The show was organised in close collaboration with the artist and Marian Ivan and Diana Ursan of Ivan Gallery, resulting in a highly introspective display.

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A Review of Bill Viola at the Royal Academy of Arts, London

Though the curators of the RA’s Michelangelo / Bill Viola exhibition, Live Death Rebirth, frame the show as a ‘conversation’, it unavoidably sets the two artists up for conflict – one that Viola seems fated to lose. Clearly aware of this temptation, the show’s Introduction over justifies; ‘it is [their] commonality, rather than a suggestion that Viola is a “modern Michelangelo” that the exhibition illuminates’.

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A Review of Walter de Maria: Idea to Action to Object at Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London

An intriguing insight into the workings behind the subliminal sculptures of late artist Walter de Maria, Gagosian’s new exhibition ‘Idea to Action to Object’ presents over forty works on paper and several related sculptures, which are on view for the first time.

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A Review of Victor Vasarely: Sharing Forms at Centre Pompidou, Paris

Hungarian-French artist Victor Vasarely embodies much of Paris and its architecture at golden hour; the shapes, abstraction and energy. Sharing Forms is the first major retrospective devoted to Victor Vasarely. In true Parisian style, this elegantly curated exhibition continued to allure and deceive with its colourful inversions of the avant-garde.

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A Review of Henry Hudson at Hannah Barry Gallery, London

Gone are the days of Hudson’s ultra-bright psychotropic jungle scenes; instead we are treated to pastel-coloured ski slopes with a custom Scagliola floor to match. The exhibition is performative, energising and entirely aesthetic yet, despite all of the niceties, there is an underlying sense of foreboding.

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A Review of Tom Wesselmann at Almine Rech Gallery, London

Almine Rech Gallery presents a provocative, uplifting survey of work made in the final years of Tom Wesselmann’s life. Large-scale Sunset Nudes (2002–4), are paired with painted aluminium wall assemblages dating from the same period, their maquettes on public display here for the first time.

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A Review of True Colours at Newport Street Gallery, London

Emerging artists Boo Saville, Helen Beard and Sadie Laska have adorned the infinite white walls of Newport Street Gallery with their playful, but progressive explorations of colour. And what an impact these evocative paintings make. Upon entering the gallery, you are met by force with a provocative series of Helen Beard’s paintings.

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A Review of Further Away at Copeland Gallery, London

Where is Further Away? How far can our imagination carry us? To Cuba, to a place of little sense, to the boundary between life and death? The ten artists featured in this exhibition at Copeland Gallery do precisely that: they transport the viewer somewhere they have not ventured yet. Curated by India Dickinson, the journey begins with Ivo Morrison’s indigo fantasies, where oneiric worlds are shrouded in mystery and nostalgia.

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