Posts in Paris
A Review of Cy Twombly's Retrospective at Centre Pompidou, Paris

As first published on Artnet, written by Sarah Hyde. The major exhibition “Cy Twombly” opened this month at Centre Pompidou with 140 works of art, including drawings, sculptures, paintings, and photographs that have been thoughtfully brought together by curator Jonas Storsve. The hanging of the exhibition is broadly chronological, and blissfully uncrowded; visitors would be advised to allow plenty of time to fully experience the works included.

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A Review of Jason Matthew Lee: Bromide Mayo at Crèvecoeur, Paris

The emerging art market is cluttered with Internet-derived and -based art, most of which is instantaneously forgettable. This art is like scrolling idly and aimlessly through web pages during a conference call.  There are artists who sample images and then awkwardly recombine them into Rosenquist-esque paintings with little regard for content or technique. Then . . . there are the few artists working in and around technology and the Internet who have something to say, clearly and confidently. Jason Matthew Lee falls into this rarefied category. 

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A Review of Jean-Luc Moulène at the Centre Pompidou, Paris

You want to touch. You want to feel the velvety surface of metamorphic rock, the cold clammy-looking surfaces of painted hard foam, the donkey's skull embedded in concrete, and the alien bronze form of a geometric shape.  You want to feel the heft of every object, large and small.  Everything is perfectly executed and flawlessly presented, like a luxury good in a showroom. "I was interested in science before I developed a taste for art," Moulène confesses in the exhibition's artist-annotated catalog.

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An Interview with the British Painter Amy Hilton in her Paris studio.

The Paris-based curator and painter Amy Hilton and I met at her studio by Barbes-Rochechouart, which she shares with the painter Laurent Godard. On a wintry weekend in Paris we drank herbal tea as she explained how she uses paint to explore philosophy. When Amy focused chanced upon two halves of pure limestone in Il-de-Re she began experimenting with watercolours and awoke to find they had dried into a delicate composition. Her exquisite studies have evolved...

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The Bettina Rheims retrospective at the Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris

Bettina Rheims is a French photographer known for her iconic portraits of female models as well as those of transsexuals, acrobats and strippers. Her oeuvre spanning thirty years is currently being exhibited at the Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris with a queue around the corner. Despite the sexuality of her work, there’s a sense of trust between the photographer...

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The Bruce Nauman Exhibition at the Gagosian Gallery, Paris

The American artist Bruce Nauman was born in Indiana in 1941. From MoMa to Deutsche Guggenheim and even the Venice Biennial, his work has travelled the world. Nauman is known for his interdisciplinary approach. Engaging with existential dichotomies like love and hate as well as pleasure and pain, he has worked across a diverse array of mediums. His fascination...

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An Interview with the Film Producer and Screenwriter Duncan Way at Chez Prune, Paris

Duncan Way is a Film Producer and Screenwriter. After starting out as a script reader in London, he assisted director Dustin Hoffman on ‘Quartet’. For the last two years he has co-run Film and TV company Lieurac Productions with Louis Le Bayon. Not only have their productions played at the Pompidou Centre and the BFI...

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The Alice Springs Retrospective at Le Musee Europeene de la Photographie in Le Marais, Paris

Alice Springs was the pseudonym used by June Newton, the wife of the illustrious Helmut, and was previously known for her black and white photographs. However, within the setting of an 18th century mansion in the depths of Le Marais, we are shown a different side to the photographer. More intimate nudes...

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An Interview with Fashion Photographer Spela Kasal at Brasserie Barbès, Paris

The photographer Spela Kasal and I met this summer in Paris on the lawns of the British Embassy, where we flicked through art magazines. An award-winning photographer, she's worked for Vogue, Interview Magazine, Lacoste, Louis Vuitton amongst others. Born in Ljubljana, Slovenia, Spela modelled between Paris and New York, where she gained insight into the inner workings of the fashion industry

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A Travel Guide to a Day in Paris in Winter.

Paris in Winter is arguably more romantic than its midsummer equivalent. After a long day of cultural and gastronomic indulgence, head to Le Comptoir General. This watering hole is a post-colonial, bohemian dream. Once you’ve edged down the pitch-black passageway, you are suddenly immersed in a tropical hideaway with velvet telephones, taxidermy and the deepest sofas you’ve ever indulged in. From the ceiling hang labyrinths of vines and disco balls, which shake with...

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The Gary Winogrand Exhibition at Le Jeu de Paume, Paris

Rejected from the blockbuster exhibitions due to December congestion, I was rather pleased with myself when I stumbled upon the Gary Winogrand retrospective at the Jeu de Paume, Paris. Most visitors would feel a sense of guilt in going to see an American retrospective when visiting Paris, but having near-exhausted all cultural possibilities when living in the city, I felt it was acceptable. Gary Winogrand (1928-84) was a street photographer who captured the vibrancy of post-war America in the mid-20th century...

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The Slow Art Movement Exhibition at L'institut Suedois in Le Marais, Paris

L’Institute Suedois , 11 Rue Payenne, Le Marais is famous for its nihilistic café and magical gardens obscured by the palatial exterior. The concept behind its exhibition was total rejection of the contemporary mass producing art in the 21st century, as the emotional impact is lost. A hypothesis which was pondered at length by the German aesthetics philosopher Immanuel Kant who believed that great art had to have a depth of soul beyond its aesthetic value. 

 

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The Martial Raysse Retrospective at Le Centre Pompidou, Paris

Le Centre Pompidou’s summer retrospective opens with a quote from Raysse, "Today’s art is a rocket in space. Prisunic supermarkets are the museums of modern art". The provocative artist Martial Raysse was born to a family of ceramicists in 1936 and became obsessed with the beauty of plastic as he worked amongst the New Realists of Nice. He moved to New York City to submerge himself in the Pop Art scene as...

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A Simple Guide to St Germain, Paris

After the sanded white floors and shabby-chic interior of my bohemian nest in Canal St Martin, I was reluctant to move to St Germain. My new home on Rue du Vieux Colombier however is enchanting: it feels like sleeping in a museum or flea market. The elderly owners once made epic journeys around the world collecting aboriginal art, gorgeous oak furniture and hundreds of ...

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A Diary of a Day in Paris, France

Here is a guide to an eclectic Saturday in Paris, beginning with some thrifty browsing at Porte au Vanves and a pause at the mosque. This offbeat market is so much more approachable than the overwhelming Marche aux Puces Saint-Ouen, which requires a whole day of searching. Sadly, there are hardly any vintage clothes apart from a couple of stalls of incredibly expensive silk and lace negligees. However, the old photograph albums, endless plates of exquisite...

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The Robert Mapplethorpe Retrospective at Le Grand Palais, Paris

The Robert Mapplethorpe retrospective at Le Grand Palais has truly ignited my obsession with his life long love affair with the elusive icon - and author of Just Kids - Patti Smith. It is an enthralling story of unconditional friendship, which goes deeper than sex, co-habitation or even fidelity. Above all, they bonded through their work and felt by magnified...

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The Kabakovs: Monumenta Exibition at Le Grand Palais, Paris

The risk of the saturday morning tourists may have seemed like a reckless choice, but after a stodgy brunch at the uber-cool, and deeply unfriendly Holy Belly in the 10th, we ventured to Le Grand Palais. L and I were there to see the biennial Monumenta commission which seemed to have fallen under the radar. After many months of assessing the New York art world together this was our first...

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Henri Cartier Bresson Retrospective at Le Centre Pompidou, Paris

The French photographer Henri Cartier Bresson’s work takes us on a journey through the twentieth century, decade by decade, capturing its changing atmosphere across a plethora of cultures. He lived from 1908 to 2004 and worked throughout his life to build this extraordinary, dynamic portfolio which stretches from Ghandi’s funeral in India to the Jazz Age in America and the horrors of both World Wars.

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