Posts in New York
A Review of Dan Walsh at Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

“Philip Guston makes an Agnes Martin,” is a phrase that Dan Walsh has often used in interviews to describe his work.  Initially this is a rather weird analogy, thinking of an aesthetic marriage of a politicized figurative painter (following on Guston’s reformation from Abstract-Expressionism) and a transcendent abstract painter, whose work is often confused with Minimalism.  You really have to scratch your head about “Guston x Martin,” borrowing the botanical “x” to symbolize the intergradient of two species. 

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A Review of Yun Hyong-keun at David Zwirner, New York

In a brief word piece titled, “The Eccentricities of an Artist,” published in 1977, Yun Hyong-keun described his life as one without any clear distinction between living and playing. When it occurs to me, I secure my canvas and paint.  At other times, I just sit absentmindedly. . . . Painting is thus enjoyable work.  But when paintings do not work out, it feels like death. . . . In any case, just as I continue to eat and live, I continue to paint. 

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A Review of Marilyn Minter: Dirty/Pretty at The Brooklyn Museum in New York

Metallic lips and outstretched tongues poised to lick. Acrylic nails, mouths crammed full of pearl necklaces and makeup-clad eyes – these are the images that come to mind when I think of Marilyn Minter, who I first discovered while absent-mindedly stalking Miley Cyrus’ Instagram. A blurred portrait showed Miley in all her usual glory - Hollywood white teeth, tongue out, licking a foggy window dripping in condensation.

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A Review of Matt Mullican: Pantagraph at Peter Freeman, New York

Matt Mullican has got them both: brains and brawn. If there were intellectual and athletic decathlons in contemporary art, Mullican would win handily. He has the genetic material, training, and discipline. Mullican is the son of artists Lee Mullican and Luchita Hurtado. His father’s work was shown earlier this year at James Cohan (New York).  His mother’s work is currently on show at Park View (Los Angeles).  Mullican’s brother, John, is a writer and documentary filmmaker.  Few families have ”the right stuff” way this one does. 

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A Review of Mark Leckey: Containers and Their Drivers at PS1, Long Island City, New York

The smell of meat stock permeated all three floors of PS1. It was an unintended olfactory punch from the Kunsthalle’s in-house restaurant, M. Wells Dinette. Yet, the cloying, unctuous odor created an additional atmospheric in Mark Leckey's sensory assault. PS1 smelled like a fatty broth or stew in an English working man's café, which seemed sort of appropriate given Leckey’s self-described working class background. 

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An Interview with the American Artist Alex Dodge at his Studio in Brooklyn, New York

When he was growing up in Colorado, Alex Dodge decided that, “if you want to make beautiful things, you have to make them yourself,” and turned to the visual arts. A connoisseur of digital art, his process involves him creating a virtual fabric and letting it drape over objects to describe their form. Over the course of his artistic development, Alex continues to ask himself, “how do you make something with a complexity and immediacy.” In response, his paintings resemble living, breathing objects.

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A Review of Pipilotti Rist: Pixel Forest at the New Museum, New York

“Help me,” reads a cool, white neon sign on the fourth floor of the New Museum, adjacent to Pipilotti Rist’s installation, 4th Floor to Mildness. It is a portent, an augury. It is visual representation, almost an echo, of a sound bite from Rist’s Selbstlos im Lavabad (Selfless In The Bath of Lava) (Bastard Version), (1994), which is in the museum’s stairwell gallery. Whether you go top down (recommended) or bottom up, this exhibition is vexing and often discomforting.

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A Review of Diana Thater: The Sympathetic Imagination at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

Diana Thater freely admits: “I couldn’t paint. So I decided I would do something I could do.”  Monet was a favorite artist of Thater’s “because of the colors and images. People love Monet.” So while Thater chose not to paint using traditional media, she finesses it using electronic media along with natural and artificial light. 

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A Review of Kerry James Marshall: Mastry at The Met Breuer, New York

Cultural America in the 1950s and 1960s was unrepentantly white.  Before I attended university in upstate New York, my exposure to Black Americans was primarily through a handful of television and movie personalities, athletes, and musicians like, Ella Fitzgerald, Sammy Davis Jr., Sidney Poitier, Ernie Banks, and Harry Belafonte.  At college on the cusp of the 1970s there were only six Blacks in my freshman class of 800.  The campus was mostly white.

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An Interview with the Digitally-Inspired Artist Austin Lee in Queens, New York

Austin Lee is an American artist known for his playful, airbrushed acrylics. Introduced by mutual friends from London, we met at his studio in Long Island City, Queens near to MoMa PS1 and the Noguchi Museum. Combining technology and art, Austin describes himself as “a computer nerd as well as an artist,” and the proof was in his digital preparatory sketches. Austin thinks of his somewhat hallucinogenic artwork as sharing an isolated moment, keeping it alive and making it timeless.

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A Review of Kyle Thurman: A Lonely Butcher at Off Vendome, New York

“Work“ is the activity and “discipline” is the pervasive ethic in a diverse selection of seductive drawings, paintings, and sculpture that make up Kyle Thurman's current exhibition at Off Vendome. The works seem deliberately unrelated, reflecting a deeply conceptual – strongly Germanic – approach to art making, rare among the many one-medium, one-look artists. There is a unifying story here, nonetheless. 

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A Review of Henry Hudson: Sun City Tanning at Sotheby's S2 Gallery, New York

When asked about the title of his exhibition at Sotheby's New York headquarters, Hudson responded, "Sun city tanning is actually the tanning salon next to my studio in east London.  When I Instagram, it always comes up as my location feed.   But I thought it worked well for the title of the show in regard to ayahuasca being the drug of the "kale" age, and how churches and public buildings in urban cities..

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An Interview with the American Photographer Chase Hall in the East Village, Manhattan

Raised in California, the multifaceted photographer and painter Chase Hall now lives in the East Village, New York. Before moving to Manhattan to be surrounded by fellow artists, he worked in LA as an assistant on fashion shoots and did some commercial photography. Known for his work’s optimism and carefree aesthetic, Chase is all about the process, and believes we ought to see more of the effort behind even the most spontaneous works of art. 

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An Interview with Turkish-born Artist Hayal Pozanti in her Studio in Queens, New York

Hayal Pozanti is a Turkish artist based in Queens, New York. Upon our first meeting, I arrived at what looked like an abandoned warehouse and climbed the stairs to find corridors of individual artist studios. Reflecting her personal aesthetic, Hayal’s work space was clean and white, but also punctuated by bold splashes of colour. As we looked out across Manhattan, she talked about her roots in Istanbul, and how it compares to New York.

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A Review of Zoe Leonard's solo exhibition 'In the Wake' at Hauser & Wirth, New York

As a phrase, "In the Wake" means in the aftermath.  Zoe Leonard’s exhibition is not just one thing, not one idea, not one emotion.  It consists of single and sets of silver gelatin prints and sculptural installations.  (Only the vibrant dye-transfer prints seen in "Analogue," which was last hung in 2015 at The Museum of Modern Art, are "absent" from this presentation.)  While Leonard’s work is often called elegiac and nostalgic, "reflective" and “heartfelt” are more appropriate.

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A Review of Jorge Mayet's Broken Landscape at Richard Taittinger Gallery, New York

Heartbreak is at the root of Jorge Mayet’s latest exhibition Broken Landscape on view at Richard Taittinger Gallery, New York. Upon entrance the viewer is struck by a large upheaved tree, a hallmark of Mayet’s oeuvre and the repeated sculptural realization of this motif comprise his latest body of work. The uprooted trees fabricated from sponge, wire, papier-mâché, textiles and acrylics hang suspended in the gallery space creating an eerie hovering garden.

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An Interview with the LA-based Artist Tahnee Lonsdale at De Buck Gallery, New York

Tahnee Lonsdale is an LA-based, British painter known for her bold, eye-catching canvases. We found each other on Instagram and later met at the Victoria Miro gallery in East London to see the Yayoi Kusama retrospective before following up with an interview at De Buck Gallery, New York where her exhibition Pipe Dreams and Rabbit Holes has been met with critical acclaim. I fell for Tahnee's work, because of the subdued pastel palettes, her innovate use of negative space and of course its raw energy.

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The Dia:Beacon Gallery, New York

Richard Serra once said, “I consider space to be a material.” In the case of Dia:Beacon, the primarily Minimalist art collection né box factory, his words ring true. The expansive space located in the upstate New York township of Beacon does not overwhelm the artworks but instead enhances the viewer’s experience of being both with the works and within them. The broad hallways, high ceilings and labyrinthine layout allow visitors to quietly navigate their own route. 

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A Review of the Frieze New York Art Fair on Randall's Island, New York City.

Over the past couple of years, Frieze New York has gained a reputation for being one of the world’s most influential contemporary art fairs with 202 galleries and 3 curated sections. Although Frieze has been running in Regent's Park, London since 2003, the New York version was only launched by Frieze Magazine in 2014. It's a testimony to the prestige upheld by the fair that New Yorkers..

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An Interview with the Artist Lina Iris Viktor in her New York Space Atelier LVXIX.

The conceptual artist Lina Iris Viktor works between the real and imagined in her spaces across London, Geneva and New York. We met in her studio off Wall Street, which is somewhere between a laboratory and an ancient Egyptian tomb. Adhering to her strict palette of gold, blue, black and white, the interiors are sublime. As both a private gallery and studio, the white half of Atelier LVXIX is a homage...

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