Posts in London
Highlights of CONDO17 across East, West and South London

Conceived by Vanessa Carlos, co-founder of Carlos/Ishikawa in Stepney Green, which represents the likes of Oscar Murillo and Ed Fornieles, this annual event allows galleries from around the world to transcend geographical boundaries and collaborate. What’s more, the whole scheme is based on generosity and mutual respect: participant galleries only have to pay their host a fee of £600 to cover expenses.

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A Review of Maya Rochat: Give Me Space at Seen Fifteen Gallery, Peckham

Rochat’s cutting-edge work has completely overtaken the gallery. Transparencies hang from the ceiling and the windows have been pasted over with digital prints on transparent vinyl, which gives a slightly psychedelic, stained-glass effect. Although Rochat trained in photography her textured work could easily be mis-interpreted as a completely different medium such as painting. She explains that, "there are no rules in my process," and her work could definitely be described as experimental.

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A Review of Feminist Avant-Garde of the 1970's at The Photographer's Gallery, London

Feminist Avant-Garde of the 1970s brings together works by no less than 48 artists from the collection of Austrian renewable-energy giants Verbund - exhibited in Britain for the first time. It features film, performance, collage and photographic works arranged thematically across two floors of the expansive West-End space. Taking its title from the curator-coined term, the show offers what is then an extensive look at the work of these groundbreaking artists.

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A Review of Cecil Beaton: Performance at Sotheby's S2 Gallery, London

‘He is sexy, yet completely sexless. As a model he is a natural.’ Indeed, when it came to Mick Jagger, English fashion photographer Cecil Beaton hit the nail on the head. In S|2’s latest exhibition in London. Performance by Cecil Beaton is a rare opportunity to view a selection of photographs taken on set of the sexually explicit gangster-crime film of the same name. Shot in 1970, the content of the film was so violent and controversial, Warner Brothers were forced to re-edit before it was suitable to be released to a British audience. 

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A Review of the Robert Rauschenberg Retrospective at Tate Modern, London

Walking into the Rauschenberg restrospective at Tate Modern feels like the landing of Allied forces on the beach.  A surge of raw, brilliant American energy on the banks of the river Thames.  The works are powerful and as much ahead of their time today as they were fifty years ago.  Tate’s show is the first full scale survey of Rauschenberg’s oeuvre since his death in 2008.  The exhibition, produced with New York’s Museum of Modern Art. 

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A Review of Flavie Audi: Cell-(estial) at Tristan Hoare Gallery, London

Tucked away in an elegant Georgian townhouse on Fitzroy Square, Flavie Audi’s kaleidoscopic glass creations at Tristan Hoare Gallery offer an otherworldly immersive experience. This is glass as you have never seen it before - experimental forms that inhibit a state far removed from the conventional everyday functions of the material. Glass is an underrated medium with regard to fine art; it thus provides an incredibly unique material for Audi’s opportunistic and insightful creative process, which she herself cites as experimental and innovative.

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A Review of 'Revive!' Curated by Galitzine Mackenzie at St. Mary Magdalene's Church, London

Revive! produced and curated by Sasha Galitzine and Olga MacKenzie invites a dynamic group of young artists to engage with the Crypt of St. Mary Magdalene’s Church, on the canals of Little Venice.  All the works, including several performances, are specific to the site, both its physical layout and symbolic significance.  Works have been placed where corpses were once laid to rest before burial.  In its time, the church was built amidst a Victorian slum. 

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A Review of France-Lise McGurn: Mondo Throb at Bosse & Baum in Peckham, London

Taken from an array of visual influences in film, art, television and music, France-Lise McGurn’s new exhibition Mondo Throb at Peckham-based gallery Bosse & Baum is an eruption of vibrant and sexually impulsive figurative paintings and drawings. Often extending beyond the confines of the canvas, McGurn creates an abundance of sensual imagery that spills out onto the walls and floor of the gallery. The composition and form of the layered figures developed from sketches derive from a multitude of influences. 

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A Review of Charlie Roberts: Juicy at Marlborough Contemporary, London

If you haven't yet heard of Kansas-born contemporary artist Charlie Roberts, you are in for a treat. Roberts' newest body of work Juicy is now on display at London's Marlborough Contemporary and showcases the artist at his very best. Juicy appears to be about the story within the story, but is it as simple as that? A hybrid collective of figurative and abstract compositions, Juicy is a visual storyboard that details the inspirations behind Roberts’ work. 

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A Review of Inside: Artists and Readers at HM Prison Reading by Artangel

Inside is both very beautiful, and very painful. - Beautiful because of the art that has been assembled, and the architecture of the prison itself.  Painful because the prison does not, at first glance, look so terrible.  It even resembles university halls of residence.  Were they not called “cells” with bars at the windows and doors that lock from the outside, these would be premium, en suite rooms. But they are not, and never were. At one point the toilets were ripped out so that inmates could not use the pipes as a form of communication. 

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A Review of The Vulgar: Fashion Redefined at Barbican Art Gallery, London

Articulately narrated and presented, the exhibition was created through the collaboration of curator Judith Clark and psychoanalyst Adam Philips. Taking Philips’ definition of “vulgar” as a starting point, the exhibition looks at 500 years of fashion through the prism of 20 different eras and themes. In Philip’s words: “vulgar is either what the vast majority of us are; or the vulgar are those who ... pretend to be something we would like to be.”

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A Review of The EY Exhibition: Wilfredo Lam at Tate Modern, London

With President Obama’s historic visit to Cuba earlier this year, the world focuses with renewed interest on the influence of Cuban social history on Modern and Contemporary art. As such there could not be a better time for the Tate Modern’s monographic retrospective of work by Cuban-born Modernist turned Surrealist artist Wifredo Lam. The EY Exhibition has been organized in conjunction with the Centre Pompidou and the Musée national d’art moderne, Paris, and curated by Dr Matthew Gale.

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A Review of The Infinite Mix: Contemporary Sound and Image at 180 The Strand, London

The Store at 180 Strand, is not the elegant exhibition space its chi-chi central London address would have you think. Instead, it is a gutted Brutalist concrete-block that shares the same building as a multi-storey car park. Acting as The Hayward Gallery’s North Bank outpost, this otherwise uninhabited space has been transformed. 

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A Review of the Sunday Art Fair in Marylebone, London

Sunday Art Fair is a youthful satellite fair running parallel to Frieze London, focusing on younger galleries showing emerging artists. Located accross from Madame Tussauds, Sunday is just a 10 minute walk through Regent’s Park from Frieze. Sunday takes over The University of Westminster’s Ambika P3, “a 14,000 square foot underground hangar once used to test concrete for Spaghetti Junction and the Channel Tunnel.” It is wonderful to step out of Regent’s Park and into a supersised science laboratory. 

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A Review of Marc Camille Chaimowicz: An Autumn Lexicon at the Serpentine Gallery, London

The heart of French artist Marc Camille Chaimowicz’s glorious new show is an exploration of how we write our own narratives through the spaces and objects around us. Utilising old and new work, found objects and the work of others, Chaimowicz has transformed the Serpentine Gallery in London into an immersive interior, that acts as a self-portrait or memoir to his own life and career

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A Review of Abstract Expressionism at the Royal Academy of Arts, London

Invigorating, intense, emotional, dramatic. The art of Abstract Expressionism that originated in a world reeling from the uncertainty of the postwar years strongly resonates with the chaotic political climate of today. It delivers an inspiring message to the potential creators of today’s culture - where destruction took place in the twentieth century, creativity arose as a confident response, pioneering new techniques 

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A Review of the Turner Prize 2016 Exhibition at Tate Britain, London

Known for its cutting-edge commentary on contemporary art, the Turner Prize 2016 opened at Tate Britain, London on September 27th, marking its 32nd year in existence. As ever, this year’s prize attracted media scrutiny upon the early announcement of its four nominees back in May, inviting the usual refrains of  "is it art?" and "what does it mean?" Fittingly then, the exhibition opens with Helen Marten’s (purposefully) enigmatic installations. 

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A Review of Uni-Verse by Anouska Beckwith at Palm Tree Gallery, Kensington

Last Friday saw the opening of photographer and multidisciplinary artist, Anouska Beckwith’s first London solo show, showcasing her own imagined Uni ~ Verse. Held at the Palm Tree Gallery on Portobello Road, the exhibition came after Beckwith’s 2015 New York solo debut Transcendence, in addition to recent group shows in London, Paris and Switzerland. Inside the gallery was an immersive organic installation of moss, shrubbery and branches set to ‘encourage gratitude and respect for the natural environment’ amongst the audience.

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A Review of Aboudia's Solo Exhibition Bombe Fantome at Jack Bell Gallery, Mayfair

The African artist Aboudia was born in Abidjan, Ivory Coast (1983) where his experiences of the 2011 civil war ultimately shaped his artistic style and practice. As the riots and violence reached a crisis point during March 2011, Aboudia was forced to take refuge in a basement studio. It is here that he began creating distinct works of art which documented the surrounding political turmoil of his country. 

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A Review of the Georgia O'Keeffe Retrospective at Tate Modern, London

Georgia O’Keeffe’s retrospective at Tate Modern coincides with the much-anticipated Switch House extension, but has independently attracted thousands of summer visitors. It is perhaps because the great American modernist gave a voice to those influential female artists overlooked during the twentieth century. Curated by Tanya Barson, the exhibition brings together six decades of O’Keeffe’s work.

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