A Review of Frieze London at Regent's Park, London

In the midst of a world pulling itself apart at the seams and erecting more barriers than taking down, Frieze – one of the bastions of a globalised and multiverse ecology – has pitched its tent in London’s garden for the 15th edition of its Regent’s Park-based art fair. As every self-respecting gallery and institution across the city puts its finest wares on display, London has never looked more culturally spritely.

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A Review of Lydia Okumura: Five Sides and Other Dimensions at Broadway 1602, New York

The work of Brazilian-born Lydia Okumura straddles both Minimalism and Conceptualism. Her work seeks to “make art in a spontaneous way, using the minimum necessary in order to express an idea. . . I want to express the immateriality in everything.” Her work follows in the footsteps of Concretism and Neo-Concretism.

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A Review of Nexus Space at Platform Southwark, London

For the 2017 edition of Art Licks weekend, Platform Southwark was taken over by sculptor Emily Motto, carpenter Ed Haslam, and audio/lighting design duo Flow Conceptions to create a multimedia interactive installation titled Nexus Space. The show is a continuation of their sculpted, habitable pods that lit up the woodland at Brainchild Festival earlier this summer.

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A Review of Skinscapes at Unit 1 Gallery | Workshop, London

Skinscapes, curated by Tatiana de Cheneviere and Giulia Vandelli is a group exhibition that, as the title suggests, presents nine artists wildly contrasting, deeply personal interpretations of the Skin. I feel the time has come to wake up to the true beauty of our skin that lies in its resilience, its sheer strength and ability to withhold all the pain and pleasure that life entails.

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A Review of Morning Defeats at Hannah Barry Gallery, London

Marie’s most recent exhibition ‘Morning Defeats’ is currently on show at the Hannah Barry Gallery, which has represented her since her first solo show back in November 2014. The exhibition presents thirty drawings in pastel on Japanese paper and also a large scale work on fabric, which includes drawings that have been applied onto the fabric with textile pens, crayons and dyes.

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A Review of Sea Sick in Paradise at Depart Foundation, Los Angeles

With one of the most dynamic surf spots in the world across the street, the Depart Foundation’s Sea Sick in Paradise evokes both the sport and the social life that informs it, with a diverse series of mediums and eras represented. While the works span many mediums and eras, what they all do is evoke the town square atmosphere of the beach, the human aspect that descends upon nature day after day. 

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An Interview with American Artist Grear Patterson in his Studio in the Bronx, New York

American artist Grear Patterson is based in the Bronx, New York. We first met at his solo exhibition True Romance at Marlborough Contemporary, where he attracted a broad spectrum of creatives and collectors from Mayfair to Hackney. Grear’s mixed-media works are known for their recurring motifs and exploring pop-culture. Despite being featured in publications like GQ and Vogue, there is no further evidence of Grear having a social media presence or even a website. 

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A Review of Feminism(s) x The Arab and Muslim Diaspora at Protein Studios, London

Feminism(s) x The Arab and Muslim Diaspora was the first in a series of exhibitions curated by Goldsmiths graduates Loren Elhili and Susanna Pousette. In part a reaction to Trump’s Muslim ban in the US, the debut show brought together female artists across a range of media to both destroy and challenge static stereotypes of Arab and Islamic women.

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A Review of All In: The Mind at House of Vans, London

Running at the House of Vans for ten days in August, ‘all in: the mind’ is a mindful group show, characterised by works which are delicate explorations of the diverse personal manifestations of mental health. An intimate exhibition, a huge variety of works are on display in this carefully curated space.  Modern and stylish in feel, the location under Waterloo’s railway arches emphasises the alternative nature of the show

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An Interview with British painter Faye Wei Wei in her South London studio.

A studio visit with Faye in South London is a transcendental experience. The painter glided around her space, making herbal tea in the Japanese tea set she’d just brought from Tokyo. It felt like entering a Parisian salon with kimonos draped over a piano, and her unique collection of seashells and old postcards scattered everywhere. Quite simply, it was like walking in a dream. 

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A Review of Colour, Order, System at Sid Motion Gallery, London

The gallery, which has this June celebrated one year since its opening, feels a staple of its surroundings and the latest show Colour, Order, System has as much dialogue with the street outside as it does between the works inside. Bringing together four artists, owner and director Sid Motion – the gallery’s namesake – has curated a show of delicate proportions and affiliations, and the title provides a rigorous underpinning of all the works on view.

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A Review of Art Night, East London

Many of the world's leading artistic institutions are uniting in a universal attempt to question the patriarchy of how we see, and participate in, works of art. Artworks are being liberated from the walls of galleries to habitats strange, and new. However, it is not just the places within which our experiences are being challenged. Wave goodbye to conventional visiting hours, and start seeing art at night.

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A Review of Raqib Shaw at the Whitworth, Manchester

Co-curated by Tate Director, Dr Maria Balshaw, Diana Campbell Betancourt, Director of Dhaka Art Summit and the artist, Shaw’s solo exhibition is part of the New North and South Network. The three-year programme consists of co-commissions, exhibitions and intellectual exchange across a network of eleven arts organisations from the North of England and South Asia and aims to bring prominence to the work of leading Bangladeshi, Indian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan and UK artists.

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A Review of Ivar Wigan: Young Love at PM/AM, London

After two years living in downtown Jamaica, Ivar Wigan gives us a rare glimpse of dancehall culture in his recent series Young Love. The hustlers, dancers, street-runners and families that make up the community all come together in the former car park that's now PM/AM gallery. The photos are not shot at random but are thoughtfully composed to communicate an honest and natural impression of his subjects, most of who have never left Jamaica due to rigid visa restrictions.

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A Review of Margherita Stein: Rebel With a Cause at Magazzino Italian Art, Cold Spring, New York.

So wrote Germano Celant in 1967 in his post-exhibition manifesto, Arte Povera: Notes for a Guerilla War.  Celant, now the Artistic Director of the Fondazione Prada in (Milan), linked the Italian neo-avant-gardes conceptually, rather than with or to any formal or stylistic bases.  Celant saw the artists common desire to destroy "the dichotomy between art and life" with process-oriented practices.

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A Review of Irina Korina at Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow

We've all visited the leading art spaces in Paris, London and New York for our fix of contemporary art; yet not many have travelled as far as Moscow. But now, with the forward-thinking Garage, our attention is turning to see what the Russian capital has to offer. With five exhibitions, a renowned magazine, cutting-edge book shop, and open-air cinema, Garage has evolved into a creative hub like no other. 

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A Review of Femininities: Guy Bourdin at Maison Chloé, Paris

The exhibition pairs archival pieces with shoots by Guy Bourdin, the photographer who photographed Chloé the most. This past Sunday, in the midst of Paris’s busy Couture Week, the French luxury fashion house Chloé unveiled its new cultural space, the Maison Chloé. The beautifully restored, multifunctional Belle-Époque building houses the brand’s archives and showrooms, but four of its five stories are dedicated to a public exhibition space, which was inaugurated this past weekend with the show “Femininities—Guy Bourdin.”

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A Review of the Goss Brothers in Shoreditch, London

Writing in a present day 30° degrees London, lulled by the tropical chirping of now-local green parakeets, surrounded by issues of the National Geographic heralding the melting of the Antarctica ice caps, it is not hard to understand how the imagery evoked by Ballard captured the imagination of the Goss Brothers who recently launched a fashion line for Folk Clothing inspired by this prescient book.

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