A Review of Ivar Wigan: Young Love at PM/AM, London

After two years living in downtown Jamaica, Ivar Wigan gives us a rare glimpse of dancehall culture in his recent series Young Love. The hustlers, dancers, street-runners and families that make up the community all come together in the former car park that's now PM/AM gallery. The photos are not shot at random but are thoughtfully composed to communicate an honest and natural impression of his subjects, most of who have never left Jamaica due to rigid visa restrictions.

Read More
A Review of Margherita Stein: Rebel With a Cause at Magazzino Italian Art, Cold Spring, New York.

So wrote Germano Celant in 1967 in his post-exhibition manifesto, Arte Povera: Notes for a Guerilla War.  Celant, now the Artistic Director of the Fondazione Prada in (Milan), linked the Italian neo-avant-gardes conceptually, rather than with or to any formal or stylistic bases.  Celant saw the artists common desire to destroy "the dichotomy between art and life" with process-oriented practices.

Read More
A Review of Irina Korina at Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow

We've all visited the leading art spaces in Paris, London and New York for our fix of contemporary art; yet not many have travelled as far as Moscow. But now, with the forward-thinking Garage, our attention is turning to see what the Russian capital has to offer. With five exhibitions, a renowned magazine, cutting-edge book shop, and open-air cinema, Garage has evolved into a creative hub like no other. 

Read More
A Review of Femininities: Guy Bourdin at Maison Chloé, Paris

The exhibition pairs archival pieces with shoots by Guy Bourdin, the photographer who photographed Chloé the most. This past Sunday, in the midst of Paris’s busy Couture Week, the French luxury fashion house Chloé unveiled its new cultural space, the Maison Chloé. The beautifully restored, multifunctional Belle-Époque building houses the brand’s archives and showrooms, but four of its five stories are dedicated to a public exhibition space, which was inaugurated this past weekend with the show “Femininities—Guy Bourdin.”

Read More
A Review of the Goss Brothers in Shoreditch, London

Writing in a present day 30° degrees London, lulled by the tropical chirping of now-local green parakeets, surrounded by issues of the National Geographic heralding the melting of the Antarctica ice caps, it is not hard to understand how the imagery evoked by Ballard captured the imagination of the Goss Brothers who recently launched a fashion line for Folk Clothing inspired by this prescient book.

Read More
A Review of Wayne Thiebaud: 1962 to 2017 at White Cube in Mason's Yard, London

Long before #instafood, #foodporn or #foodart became Instagrammable sensations, American artist Wayne Thiebaud had made a profitable and lengthy career out of it. Melting ice-creams in wafer cones, perfectly poised cherries on cinnamon buns and swirling dollops of sugar icing were the rising stars of his early compositions. You could say that Thiebaud paved the way for a modern obsession with beautiful food. 

Read More
A Review of Further Away at Copeland Gallery, London

Where is Further Away? How far can our imagination carry us? To Cuba, to a place of little sense, to the boundary between life and death? The ten artists featured in this exhibition at Copeland Gallery do precisely that: they transport the viewer somewhere they have not ventured yet. Curated by India Dickinson, the journey begins with Ivo Morrison’s indigo fantasies, where oneiric worlds are shrouded in mystery and nostalgia.

Read More
A Review of Joel Shapiro at Pace Gallery, London

Playful shapes in primary colours seem to defy gravity at Pace London this June. Joel Shapiro’s whimsically hung sculptures inaugurate the artist’s first solo exhibition at the London space, where seven vibrant sculptures and a selection of works on paper make for a subtle yet refined overview of Shapiro’s recent output.

Read More
A Review of Ry David Bradley: 21th Century at PM/AM Gallery, London

Founded in early 2015 by Patrick Barstow, PM/AM is a gallery space, which aims to challenge the existing models that we use to interact with art. By introducing 3D glasses and ocular manipulation, Ry Bradley’s exhibition: 21th Century does just that. Juxtaposing the white and grey setting are Bradley’s kaleidoscopic pieces. French impressionism immediately springs to mind, as the paintings are reminiscent of Monet’s Water Lilies.

Read More
A Review of Peckham 24 in Peckham, London

As the art world elite concluded their annual Photo London gathering at Somerset House, Peckham was just warming up by presenting a festival of exhibitions that encompassed a network of Peckham-based artists, galleries and curators. Founded by Vivienne Gamble and Jo Dennis, Peckham 24, is a 24-hour celebration of contemporary photography. The festival is spread across a variety of locations in Peckham, including The Bussey Building, Copeland Park and other local galleries. Far from the exclusivity and structure of Somerset House, the non-ticketed festival instead welcomes a wide audience to see a diverse selection of photography.

Read More
An Interview with Sang Woo Kim at his Studio in Bethnal Green, London

Sang Woo Kim is an artist and model whose current body of work focuses on the challenges of identity as he balances the duality of his creative professions with the realities of being a Korean immigrant brought up in London. Although modelling for international brands such as Burberry, Diesel, DKNY and Dolce & Gabanna supported his studies at Goldsmiths, and Central St Martins, he's often found himself to be taken less seriously as an artist as a result.

Read More
A Review of In Praise of Shadows at Cassina Projects, New York

Stepping into the polished concrete, white walled interior of the Chelsea’s Cassina Projects, one wouldn’t expect these to be the words echoing in their mind upon entering the gallery space. And yet, Junichiro Tanizaki’s musings on Japanese aesthetics feel particularly apt to describe the works featured in this exhibition curated by ARTUNER, which borrows its title from the writer’s most famous essay, ‘In Praise of Shadows’.

Read More
A Review of American Honey, Directed by Andrea Arnold

"I’m not going to make an apology for the length. I don’t even mind if people go to the toilet in the middle of it. It’s fine’ declared American Honey's director Andrea Arnold in an interview with Vogue magazine. It's true, you could walk out for five minutes and not be any worse off. There isn’t really a plot, but far from thinking was too long, I never wanted to finish.

Read More
A Review of Frieze New York at Randall's Island, New York

Frieze New York is an annual event, which attracts a broad spectrum of collectors, artists and gallerists to make the pilgrimage over the East River and discover an impressive selection of both modern and contemporary art. Across just four days, their hugely diverse audience are exposed to a plethora of cutting-edge works exhibited by more than 200 international galleries as well as a developed program of art talks, lectures and curator-led tours. 

Read More
A Review of A__ is A__ curated by Antonia Marsh at Golborne Gallery

Young curator Antonia Marsh’s group show A _______ is A ______ currently on show at Golborne Gallery presents a seductive dystopian vision of everyday life. Although on the surface the small gallery may appear to be a complacent collection of works revelling in the mundane, there is a distinct punk spirit to be felt and a tangible yearning for something better than that which is.

Read More
A Review of Eddie Martinez: Cowboy Town at Timothy Taylor

With white-washed walls, large colour-splashed figurative canvases, beautifully-bound catalogues and a seriously cool London address, Timothy Taylor is a contemporary art collector’s dream space. Currently exhibiting Eddie Martinez’s second solo show, Cowboy Town, Timothy Taylor has, yet again, shot the lights out.The paintings are raw, bold and predominantly figurative.

Read More
A Review of Lightness at White Rainbow Gallery, London

White Rainbow gallery has united five artists’ explorations of the notion of weightlessness, displaying how artists reconfigure material to distort their physical properties, or so the press release claims. The room is mostly filled with sculptural forms, except for a few wall-mounted works by artist duo Ittah Yoda that hang quietly triumphant behind their neighbours who, despite all their efforts, only seem to prove the rule that weight is an aspect that simply cannot be altered.

Read More
An Interview with David Uzochukwu in Brussels, Belgium

David Uzochukwu is a self-taught, 18-year-old photographer based between Paris and Brussels. In recent years, he has progressed from self-portraiture to major collaborations shooting FKA Twigs for Nike as well as a series for Adobe Photoshop. Whilst shooting for publications such as Hunger Magazine, Dazed Digital, Wonderland Magazine and Vogue, David has always managed to preserve his creative integrity and strong narrative vision, especially across the fine art photography you’ll find in his portfolio.

Read More
A Review of Desert X in the Coachella Valley, California

“The cliche of the journey being the destination is partly true in this case,” opened Neville Wakefield at the inauguration of the Desert X biennial in Palm Springs. Lasting until April 30, Desert X brings together 14 artists investigating the broad cultural, social, and ecological impacts of the desert. Set across 40 square miles of the Coachella Valley, the works take viewers to nature preserves, A-frame motels, and underground survival shelters. 

Read More